GMAIL turns 15, HBD

GMAIL turns 15, HBD

  • Apr 3, 2019
  • g/Tech
  • Ahmedz
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Google unveiled its new Stadia cloud gaming service
Google unveiled its new Stadia cloud gaming service
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Are you aware Samsung S10 is out, check

Are you aware Samsung S10 is out, check

  • Feb 25, 2019
  • g/Tech
  • Ahmedz
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21-year-old Ghanaian tech genius behind Uber, Instagram and Snapchat

  • Jan 1, 2019
  • g/Tech
  • Kwaku
Iddris Sandu, the young award-winning innovator is truly an inspiration. From learning Java at age 10 to developing his first app on the original Apple iPhone, he continues his rise in the tech world with projects which includes The Wireless Charging Table, Lifestyle One Wearable, Project ACDI Uber, Kera- Artificial Intelligence Operating System, Iris Scan Technology etc. Iddris recently helped rapper Nipsey Hussle create The Marathon Clothing, a smart store in Los Angeles and also partnered with Kanye West and Jaden Smith on a few future businesses, clothing lines and disaster relief projects that are set to launch in 2019. During his days in High school, Iddris developed a mobile software that would later gain the attention of former U.S. President Barack Obama and land him at the White House, where he received the honorary presidential scholar award. He was only 16 years old. Now 21, the Los Angeles-based young man is the self-made tech guru who has accomplished many incredible feats, including being responsible for algorithms that have made Uber, Instagram and Snapchat what they are today. The software engineer considers himself a “cultural architect” and said he aims to “level the playing field” between Silicon Valley and young communities of colour. Iddris was born and raised in Harbor City, California by his Ghanaian parents. The young lad spoke about the harrowing experience he had when he was just eight and his father had wanted to take him on a trip to Ghana. “But on the fourth day of the trip, he abandoned me in this village, took my passport and came back to the States,” Sandu told Oxford University’s Music and Style Magzine, adding that he was abandoned for almost nine months before getting into contact with an NGO which helped him travel back home. He got back to the U.S. when the first-ever iPhone was unveiled, and this started his journey into the tech world. “I just got super inspired. I thought – this device is going to change the world. The reason why the iPhone was so important was because it was the first time when regular consumers could develop for other regular consumers. Before, you really had to work at a tech company for multiple years to be able to offer any sort of input or to create an app. But Apple made it so mainstream. I knew it was the future,” he said. Just 10 years old then, Sandu started learning programming on his own for the next two years at a public library and this was where he got spotted by a designer from Google, who offered him an internship opportunity at the company’s headquarters. At age 13, he got his first experience with programming and worked on many projects such as the initial Google blogger, Google Plus, among others. Yet, Sandu was determined to affect change, hence, at the age of 15, he designed an app for his high school that gave students turn by turn directions to navigate their classrooms. Being the only school in California that had an app made by a student, Sandu received wide acclaim that would later afford him a meeting with former President Obama. During that same period, Sandu wrote an algorithm that he would go on to sell to Instagram and by the age of 18, he was already consulting for Snapchat before landing at Uber, where he created a software (Autonomous Collision Detection Interface) for its self-driving cars. With the passion to bridge the gap between the informed and uninformed, and to inculcate into young people like him the need for invention and creativity, he left major tech companies to bring that change. “Information is one of the highest forms of class. And that is what keeps people divided. You should be able to think on a higher level, instead of being strictly consumers. And people of colour in particular are more likely to be consumers than creators. It’s really hard to get out of poverty or to change the structure of economic power if you’re always going to be a consumer rather than creating. Shifting that narrative is what I’ve been trying to do. And thus far, it’s worked, it’s successful.” From encouraging the study of STEM subjects in schools and at higher levels, Sandu, in 2017, met rapper Nipsey Hussle at local Starbucks, and in three weeks, they had transformed an abandoned storefront in Los Angeles into the Marathon Clothing Store. The smart store offers exclusive music and other content to customers who have downloaded an app, said The New York Times. The store leveraged Iddris’ tech and design background and Nipsey’s cultural influences, sparking the interests of many journalists as well as hip-hop and cultural icons like Russell Westbrook, Vegas Jones of Roc Nation, among others. In an interview with the CNBC, Sandu said the store has helped him bridge the gap between culture and technology, and would love others to do same. “We are living in the digital revolution,” he said. Although “we are all constantly exposing ourselves to content in real-time.” “We need to address the largest issues affecting communities and build infrastructure on that,” Sandu said. The tech wizard has since partnered with Kanye West and Jaden Smith on some future businesses, clothing lines and disaster relief projects that are set to launch in 2019, according to CNBC. Having created his own music, putting together the sonics and instrumentals in just 3 days to form a full album, the creative technologist is working on a book about recent initiators, including Kanye West; Robi Reed, a casting director; and Edward Enninful, the editor of British Vogue. With the drive to use all his networks to empower young people in America to make a positive impact in their communities, the unconventional tech genius is already on his way to become a leader for the next generation of influencers and entrepreneurs. source: howafrica.com
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A man 3D-printed a copy of himself to cheat facial recognition and Ai

  • Dec 20, 2018
  • g/Tech
  • Kwaku
A lot of issues coming up with Artificial Intelligence, but it’s hard to argue convincingly that facial recognition isn’t going to play a role in the future of technology. The newest Apple iPhones and Android smartphones have built-in facial recognition features that can unlock your device, but you would be wrong to think that the reliability and accuracy of the features is comparable. After all, in the past, owners of Samsung Android phones have demonstrated how devices can be unlocked by pointing it at the face of a sleeping person or even with just a photograph. It’s true to say that the facial recognition technology built into handsets has improved in recent years. And as it has become more reliable, more users are likely to use it as their primary method of unlocking a phone rather than having to remember a sequence of numbers or a password. Forbes journalist Thomas Brewster wanted to find out just how well a variety of Android phones and a top-of-the-range Apple iPhone would fare against a determined attempt to break facial recognition. And he did that by having a 3D-model printed of his head. As Brewster explains, he engaged the services of a small British company in Birmingham to create a spooky life-size 3D print of his own head for just over £300. For the price, it’s an impressive likeness, but it’s not enough to fool any human into thinking they are looking at the real Thomas Brewster. But could a smartphone be fooled? To find out, Brewster registered his own (real) face with five different phones: An iPhone X, an LG G7 Linq, a Samsung S9, a Samsung Note 8 and a OnePlus 6. With facial recognition setup, all he had to do was see if his fake head would be convincing enough to unlock the devices. Rather worryingly (if someone has managed to make a 3D-printed version of your head), all four Android phones were duped into thinking they were looking at the real Tom. Only the iPhone X wasn’t duped. It’s certainly impressive to see Apple’s iPhone X not be tricked by Thomas Brewster’s fake head, and it may surprise owners of Android smartphones who have had at best mixed experiences with facial recognition. From this test at least, it would appear that the efforts made by Apple’s engineers to develop its “TrueDepth” camera technology (which uses more than 30,000 infrared dots to scan your face in 3D) has paid off. It’s worth pointing out that some of the Android phones were easier to unlock than others, (The LG, for instance, proved trickier to unlock, as it required a little more effort in finding the combination of lighting and angles.) but that’s not something that is going to in any way deter a determined intruder from breaking into your device. What is somewhat encouraging is that there are alerts displayed by some of the Android devices when the user attempts to enable facial recognition, warning that the feature can actually make your phone less secure. The LG G7 Linq, for instance, warns that similar faces can be used to unlock it: Face recognition is a secondary unlock method that results in your phone being less secure. Meanwhile, the Samsung S9 displayed the following warning: “Your phone could be unlocked by someone or something that looks like you. If you use facial recognition only, this will be less secure than using a pattern, PIN or password.” No-one may be planning to make a life-size 3D-printed version of your head, but you should still take the warnings of the manufacturers seriously. If you want to keep your device secure, you may be sensible not to put all of your eggs in one basket but instead treat facial recognition as a secondary unlock feature that should be used alongside (rather than instead of) a password or fingerprint.
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Hands down for Microsoft new Surface Studio 2
Hands down for Microsoft new Surface Studio 2

Hands down for Microsoft new Surface Studio 2

  • Nov 29, 2018
  • g/Tech
  • Ahmedz
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